Exploring the under-representation of women in leadership roles in the information technology industry

Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisor Loughlin, Catherine A. (Catherine Anne), 1967-
dc.creator Jacquemard, Estelle
dc.date.accessioned 2015-10-29T14:54:31Z
dc.date.available 2015-10-29T14:54:31Z
dc.date.issued 2015
dc.identifier.uri http://library2.smu.ca/xmlui/handle/01/26431
dc.description 1 online resource (32 p.)
dc.description Includes abstract and appendices.
dc.description Includes bibliographical references (p. 24-28).
dc.description.abstract The information Technology (IT) industry has rightly been described as a male-dominated environment for some time. Although more women are now working in this sector, it does not mean that they have the same advancement opportunities as their male counterparts. The higher the level on the organizational chart, the more women are underrepresented. I conducted a series of interviews with six women, who have reached an executive status in this industry, to find out the common traits that may explain how they succeeded and what could be done to lessen the effects of female underrepresentation in the IT industry. The results showed that various academic backgrounds allowed these women to get their first IT job; but none of their degrees were specifically focused in IT. Once the participants started in this industry, they liked the challenges and the opportunities that they found and decided to stay working in this field. With no mentors – but sponsors – they were able to make their way to the top and at the same time raise families, due to supportive and helping partners. While we are beginning to see change in the IT industry, we must do more if we want to see equal representation of men and women at executive levels. These interviews suggest that the process may be twofold – first of all, during childhood, veering away from gender biases to encourage learning in all fields (i.e., science, technology, engineering, and math). Secondly, creating organizations that are willing to offer flexible environments with no tolerance for biases, equal compensation for equal work, and a fair advancement process. en_CA
dc.language.iso en en_CA
dc.publisher Halifax, N.S. : Saint Mary's University
dc.title Exploring the under-representation of women in leadership roles in the information technology industry en_CA
dc.title.alternative Female leaders in information technology
dc.type Text en_CA
thesis.degree.name Master of Business Administration
thesis.degree.level Masters
thesis.degree.discipline Sobey School of Business
thesis.degree.discipline Management
thesis.degree.grantor Saint Mary's University (Halifax, N.S.)


Files in this item

 
 

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record