Changes in root associated fungal communities during fine root decomposition in Abies balsamea and Picea rubens

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dc.creator Gray, Logan
dc.date.accessioned 2016-06-22T14:11:22Z
dc.date.available 2016-06-22T14:11:22Z
dc.date.issued 2016
dc.identifier.other QK604.2 C64 G73 2016
dc.identifier.uri http://library2.smu.ca/handle/01/26551
dc.description xi, 144 leaves : ill. (some col.) ; 29 cm.
dc.description Includes abstract and appendices.
dc.description Includes bibliographical references.
dc.description.abstract Fine roots are ephemeral roots < 2 mm in diameter that are frequently replaced during fine root turnover. As fine roots harbour symbiotic and commensal fungi, their trophic strategy may shift upon fine root senescence and decomposition. This study examined fungal communities in Abies balsamea and Picea rubens fine roots during decomposition. Observations of ectomycorrhizae showed that Cenococcum geophilum was recalcitrant, showing no appreciable decomposition after 16 months. Hyaline ectomycorrhizae were least recalcitrant and were not detected beyond four months. Differences between ectomycorrhizal recalcitrance may subsequently affect fine root decomposition. Molecular analysis showed: an ectomycorrhizal community becoming dominated by Piloderma; an increase in helotialian endophytes; and a relatively limited presence of saprotrophs. The most common saprotroph detected increased in concert with the endophytes. Increases in endophytic abundance suggests that they may be involved in the decomposition of fine roots in forest soils. en_CA
dc.language.iso en en_CA
dc.publisher Halifax, N.S. : Saint Mary's University
dc.subject.lcc QK604.2.C64
dc.subject.lcsh Fungal communities
dc.subject.lcsh Plant-fungus relationships
dc.subject.lcsh Forest litter -- Biodegradation
dc.subject.lcsh Balsam fir -- Roots
dc.subject.lcsh Red Spruce -- Roots
dc.title Changes in root associated fungal communities during fine root decomposition in Abies balsamea and Picea rubens en_CA
dc.type Text en_CA
thesis.degree.name Master of Science in Applied Science
thesis.degree.level Masters
thesis.degree.discipline Biology
thesis.degree.grantor Saint Mary's University (Halifax, N.S.)


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