Complex relationships : the state, privateers, & organized crime

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dc.contributor.advisor Schneider, Stephen, 1963-
dc.creator Longard, Rhonda
dc.date.accessioned 2019-06-21T14:16:55Z
dc.date.available 2019-06-21T14:16:55Z
dc.date.issued 2019
dc.identifier.uri http://library2.smu.ca/handle/01/28930
dc.description 1 online resource (68 pages)
dc.description Includes abstract and appendices.
dc.description Includes bibliographical references (pages 57-61).
dc.description.abstract The purpose of this research is to examine the history and nature of privateers during the 17th through the 19th centuries with the aim in answering this question: Using contemporary definitions, can the business of privateering can be categorized as organized crime? Privateering has long been considered, not only a legal course of reprisal for wartime losses, but also a heroic action that was celebrated, at least on the side of the privateer. The reality is more complex. In order to explain why privateers were employed despite the harm they perpetrated throughout the Maritimes during the seventeenth to nineteenth centuries, this paper incorporates a blend of sociology, criminology, Atlantic Canadian history, and political economy to show the connection between privateering and organized crime. It draws on a combination of sources to gather data on the complex history and nature of privateering. It also applies a combination of definitions to show that this class of mercenary/merchant marine were not only necessary in establishing the interests of foreign powers in Canada, but were also instrumental in the foundation and development of the early government in the Maritimes; shaping the course Canada would rise to or take in the coming two centuries. Finally, Stephen Schneider’s 23-point comprehensive taxonomy of the characteristics of an organized crime conspiracy is applied, along with the historical and contemporary evidence to point to a classification of privateering as organized crime. en_CA
dc.language.iso en en_CA
dc.publisher Halifax, N.S. : Saint Mary's University
dc.title Complex relationships : the state, privateers, & organized crime en_CA
dc.type Text en_CA
thesis.degree.name Bachelor of Arts (Honours Criminology)
thesis.degree.level Undergraduate
thesis.degree.discipline Criminology
thesis.degree.grantor Saint Mary's University (Halifax, N.S.)


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